Difference between revisions of "Annual grasses"

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http://hcs.osu.edu/albums/SK_Notes/poaannua2.sized.jpg<br><br>
 
http://hcs.osu.edu/albums/SK_Notes/poaannua2.sized.jpg<br><br>
 
''Poa annua'' shown in the above photograph is a winter annual appearing in this bermudagrass green.<br>
 
''Poa annua'' shown in the above photograph is a winter annual appearing in this bermudagrass green.<br>
Source: Ohio State Turf<br><br>
+
Source: Ohio State University Turfgrass Program<br><br>
  
 
http://hcs.osu.edu/albums/SK_Notes/crabground.sized.jpg<br><br>
 
http://hcs.osu.edu/albums/SK_Notes/crabground.sized.jpg<br><br>
 
Crabgrass is an annual, germinating in the spring, growing and developing through the summer, producing seed in late summer and then dying at the first frost.<br>
 
Crabgrass is an annual, germinating in the spring, growing and developing through the summer, producing seed in late summer and then dying at the first frost.<br>
Source: Ohio State Turf<br><br>
+
Source: Ohio State University Turfgrass Program<br><br>

Revision as of 16:05, 20 August 2007


1. Grasses, which complete their life cycles in one year.

poaannua2.sized.jpg

Poa annua shown in the above photograph is a winter annual appearing in this bermudagrass green.
Source: Ohio State University Turfgrass Program

crabground.sized.jpg

Crabgrass is an annual, germinating in the spring, growing and developing through the summer, producing seed in late summer and then dying at the first frost.
Source: Ohio State University Turfgrass Program