Difference between revisions of "Bateson, William 1861-1926"

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(New page: '''Bateson''' was an outstanding British biologist born at Whitby, England, the son of the Master of St. John's College, Cambridge University. He occupied the first chair in genetics at C...)
 
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'''Bateson''' was an outstanding British biologist born at Whitby, England, the son of the Master of St. John's College, Cambridge University.
 
'''Bateson''' was an outstanding British biologist born at Whitby, England, the son of the Master of St. John's College, Cambridge University.
  
He occupied the first chair in genetics at Cambridge University. He recognized the importance of the work of Gregor Mendel and elaborated on the significance of Mendel's results.
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He occupied the first chair in genetics at Cambridge University. He recognized the importance of the work of [[Mendel, Gregor Johann 1822-1884|Gregor Mendel]] and elaborated on the significance of Mendel's results.
  
Bateson introduced and defended Mendel's principle that "heredity occurs by the transmission of particulate elements, genes, against the view that it was continuous and non-particulate," (Encyclopedia Brittanica).
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Bateson introduced and defended Mendel's principle that "heredity occurs by the transmission of particulate elements, genes, against the view that it was continuous and non-particulate," (''Encyclopedia Brittanica'').
  
His classical work was Materials for the Study of Variation (1894). He also published Mendel's Principles of Heredity (1902) and Problems of Genetics (1913).
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His classical work was ''Materials for the Study of Variation'' (1894). He also published Mendel's ''Principles of Heredity'' (1902) and ''Problems of Genetics'' (1913).
  
 
He was Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institution from 1910 until his death.
 
He was Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institution from 1910 until his death.

Revision as of 14:30, 8 July 2008

Bateson was an outstanding British biologist born at Whitby, England, the son of the Master of St. John's College, Cambridge University.

He occupied the first chair in genetics at Cambridge University. He recognized the importance of the work of Gregor Mendel and elaborated on the significance of Mendel's results.

Bateson introduced and defended Mendel's principle that "heredity occurs by the transmission of particulate elements, genes, against the view that it was continuous and non-particulate," (Encyclopedia Brittanica).

His classical work was Materials for the Study of Variation (1894). He also published Mendel's Principles of Heredity (1902) and Problems of Genetics (1913).

He was Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institution from 1910 until his death.



MendelWeb

Source: http://www.mendelweb.org/