Difference between revisions of "Hogg, Thomas 1771-1841"

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(New page: '''Thomas Hogg''' was in charge of an "Academy" in what is now part of London. Leaving this profession he became a florist possessing, stated Johnson (''History of Gardening'', 1829) a col...)
 
 
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'''Thomas Hogg''' was in charge of an "Academy" in what is now part of London. Leaving this profession he became a florist possessing, stated Johnson (''History of Gardening'', 1829) a collection of carnations and piccotees which was the finest in the world. He had more than 700 cultivars which he sold at prices ranging from "two to sixty shillings."
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'''Thomas Hogg''' was in charge of an "Academy" in what is now part of London. Leaving this profession he became a florist possessing, stated [[Johnson, George W. 1802-1866|Johnson]] (''History of Gardening'', 1829) a collection of carnations and piccotees which was the finest in the world. He had more than 700 cultivars which he sold at prices ranging from "two to sixty shillings."
  
 
He was author of the following book, ''A Concise and Practical Treatise on the Growth and Culture of the Carnation, Pink, Auricula, Polyanitius, Ranunculus, Tulip, etc.'' (1812). This book was an outstanding one of the period and describes in much detail the various methods of cultivation of the so-called "florists' flowers."
 
He was author of the following book, ''A Concise and Practical Treatise on the Growth and Culture of the Carnation, Pink, Auricula, Polyanitius, Ranunculus, Tulip, etc.'' (1812). This book was an outstanding one of the period and describes in much detail the various methods of cultivation of the so-called "florists' flowers."
  
 
[[Category:8. 18th Century A.D.]]
 
[[Category:8. 18th Century A.D.]]

Latest revision as of 16:48, 8 July 2008

Thomas Hogg was in charge of an "Academy" in what is now part of London. Leaving this profession he became a florist possessing, stated Johnson (History of Gardening, 1829) a collection of carnations and piccotees which was the finest in the world. He had more than 700 cultivars which he sold at prices ranging from "two to sixty shillings."

He was author of the following book, A Concise and Practical Treatise on the Growth and Culture of the Carnation, Pink, Auricula, Polyanitius, Ranunculus, Tulip, etc. (1812). This book was an outstanding one of the period and describes in much detail the various methods of cultivation of the so-called "florists' flowers."