Difference between revisions of "Laurence, John 1668-1732"

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(New page: '''Laurence''' received his BA at Cambridge University in 1688. He became Rector in Northamptonshire in 1703. He immediately improved the soil of the Rectory garden and grew the "choicest ...)
 
 
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He was one of sixteen English clergymen who wrote important gardening books in the 18th Century. These books indicate the extent to which gardening had become an important part of the life of clergyman, "gentlemen," and their wives.
 
He was one of sixteen English clergymen who wrote important gardening books in the 18th Century. These books indicate the extent to which gardening had become an important part of the life of clergyman, "gentlemen," and their wives.
  
Johnson (1829) states that he was "one of the most excellent writers upon the art."
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[[Johnson, George W. 1802-1866|Johnson]] (1829) states that he was "one of the most excellent writers upon the art."
  
 
[[Category:7. 17th Century A.D.]]
 
[[Category:7. 17th Century A.D.]]

Latest revision as of 18:12, 8 July 2008

Laurence received his BA at Cambridge University in 1688. He became Rector in Northamptonshire in 1703. He immediately improved the soil of the Rectory garden and grew the "choicest fruit." He became Rector in the County of Durham in North England shortly before his death.

He was a naturalist and very interested in horticulture, especially the culture of fruits. He stated working in his garden was "the best and almost only physick" he loved.

The Clergyman's Recreation, showing the pleasure and profit of the art of Gardening (1714). This went through six editions to 1726. The Gentleman's Recreation (1716) - third edition in 1723. The Fruit Garden Kalendar (1718).

He was one of sixteen English clergymen who wrote important gardening books in the 18th Century. These books indicate the extent to which gardening had become an important part of the life of clergyman, "gentlemen," and their wives.

Johnson (1829) states that he was "one of the most excellent writers upon the art."