Difference between revisions of "Magnus, Albertus 1193-1280 (approx)"

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'''Albertus Magnus''' was known also as Albert of Bollstadt and Albert the Great. He was unusually gifted and had an outstanding reputation as teacher, philosopher, theologian and naturalist. Albertus Magnus was called the "Aristotle of the Middle Ages." He had an extensive knowledge of geography, astronomy, medicine, botany, and zoology. He taught in various places in Germany and was in Paris from 1245 to 1248 where he taught the doctrines of Aristotle. His writings fill 21 folio volumes. His principal work of interest to us is ''De Vegetabilibus'' which was widely read in the 13th and 14th centuries even in "farm houses and homes."
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'''Albertus Magnus''' was known also as Albert of Bollstadt and Albert the Great. He was unusually gifted and had an outstanding reputation as teacher, philosopher, theologian and naturalist. Albertus Magnus was called the "[[Aristotle 384-322 B.C.|Aristotle]] of the Middle Ages." He had an extensive knowledge of geography, astronomy, medicine, botany, and zoology. He taught in various places in Germany and was in Paris from 1245 to 1248 where he taught the doctrines of Aristotle. His writings fill 21 folio volumes. His principal work of interest to us is ''De Vegetabilibus'' which was widely read in the 13th and 14th centuries even in "farm houses and homes."
  
 
[[Category:3. 12th Century A.D.]]
 
[[Category:3. 12th Century A.D.]]

Latest revision as of 13:38, 9 July 2008

Albertus Magnus was known also as Albert of Bollstadt and Albert the Great. He was unusually gifted and had an outstanding reputation as teacher, philosopher, theologian and naturalist. Albertus Magnus was called the "Aristotle of the Middle Ages." He had an extensive knowledge of geography, astronomy, medicine, botany, and zoology. He taught in various places in Germany and was in Paris from 1245 to 1248 where he taught the doctrines of Aristotle. His writings fill 21 folio volumes. His principal work of interest to us is De Vegetabilibus which was widely read in the 13th and 14th centuries even in "farm houses and homes."