Difference between revisions of "Parkinson, John 1567-1650"

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'''Parkinson''' was the last British writer who belonged to the lineage of herbalists. He cultivated a famous garden in what is now the heart of London. He became herbalist to Charles I. His earlier book was a gardening work ''Paradisi in Sole-Paradisus Terrestris, A Garden of All Sorts of Pleasant Flowers, which our English Ayre will permit to be "noursed up"'' (1629). This contained elaborate directions for treatment of a garden, with an account of the plants cultivated at the time and their uses. The wood engravings were of great merit. Some are copies from [[De L'Ecluse, Charles 1526-1609|De l'Eluse]] and [[de L'Obel, Mathias (de Lobel or Lobelius 1538-1616)|de l'Obel]] and others.
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'''Parkinson''' was the last British writer who belonged to the lineage of herbalists. He cultivated a famous garden in what is now the heart of London. He became herbalist to Charles I. His earlier book was a gardening work ''Paradisi in Sole-Paradisus Terrestris, A Garden of All Sorts of Pleasant Flowers, which our English Ayre will permit to be "noursed up"'' (1629). This contained elaborate directions for treatment of a garden, with an account of the plants cultivated at the time and their uses. The wood engravings were of great merit. Some are copies from [[De L'Ecluse, Charles 1526-1609|De L'Eluse]] and [[de L'Obel, Mathias (de Lobel or Lobelius 1538-1616)|de l'Obel]] and others.
  
 
His larger work was known as ''Theatrum botanicum: The Theater of Plants or an Herball of a Large Extent'' (1640).
 
His larger work was known as ''Theatrum botanicum: The Theater of Plants or an Herball of a Large Extent'' (1640).
  
 
[[Category:6. 16th Century A.D.]]
 
[[Category:6. 16th Century A.D.]]

Latest revision as of 13:13, 9 July 2008

Parkinson was the last British writer who belonged to the lineage of herbalists. He cultivated a famous garden in what is now the heart of London. He became herbalist to Charles I. His earlier book was a gardening work Paradisi in Sole-Paradisus Terrestris, A Garden of All Sorts of Pleasant Flowers, which our English Ayre will permit to be "noursed up" (1629). This contained elaborate directions for treatment of a garden, with an account of the plants cultivated at the time and their uses. The wood engravings were of great merit. Some are copies from De L'Eluse and de l'Obel and others.

His larger work was known as Theatrum botanicum: The Theater of Plants or an Herball of a Large Extent (1640).