Difference between revisions of "Prince, William 1766-1842"

From PLANTFACTS.OSU.EDU
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
'''Prince''' was the son of William Prince. During the lifetime of this member of the family the nursery became one of the centers of horticultural and botanical interest in America and reached the height of its fame. He continued the work of his father in introducing all foreign trees and plants of value. He also attempted to include American species and also to create new cultivars by selection of seedlings. For 50 years the nursery was conducted much less for profit than for a love of horticulture. It was designed to contain every known kind of tree, shrub, vine and plant known to England and America that possessed horticultural merit. The catalogues from 1815 to 1850 ranked among the standard horticultural publications of the country.
+
'''Prince''' was the son of [[Prince, William 1725-1802 (approx)|William Prince]]. During the lifetime of this member of the family the nursery became one of the centers of horticultural and botanical interest in America and reached the height of its fame. He continued the work of his father in introducing all foreign trees and plants of value. He also attempted to include American species and also to create new cultivars by selection of seedlings. For 50 years the nursery was conducted much less for profit than for a love of horticulture. It was designed to contain every known kind of tree, shrub, vine and plant known to England and America that possessed horticultural merit. The catalogues from 1815 to 1850 ranked among the standard horticultural publications of the country.
  
 
In 1828 he wrote and published his ''Treatise on Horticulture'', the first work of its kind in America.
 
In 1828 he wrote and published his ''Treatise on Horticulture'', the first work of its kind in America.

Revision as of 17:27, 8 July 2008

Prince was the son of William Prince. During the lifetime of this member of the family the nursery became one of the centers of horticultural and botanical interest in America and reached the height of its fame. He continued the work of his father in introducing all foreign trees and plants of value. He also attempted to include American species and also to create new cultivars by selection of seedlings. For 50 years the nursery was conducted much less for profit than for a love of horticulture. It was designed to contain every known kind of tree, shrub, vine and plant known to England and America that possessed horticultural merit. The catalogues from 1815 to 1850 ranked among the standard horticultural publications of the country.

In 1828 he wrote and published his Treatise on Horticulture, the first work of its kind in America.


The Blooming of Flushing

Source: http://www.newsday.com/community/guide/lihistory/ny-history-chap3cov,0,109761.storygallery